Reading Plus

Beyond Common

Preparing America’s students for college and career.

Research Briefs

TITLE:

The Effect of Reading Plus on Student Achievement as Measured by the Smarter Balanced (SBAC) Assessment

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS:

Students who completed at least 80% of recommended Reading Plus assignments (100 lessons / 30 hours) achieved significantly larger gains on the SBAC ELA assessment in comparison to a group of demographically similar students who had minimal or no Reading Plus use (p < .001).

“Three times as many Reading Plus students advanced from SBAC ELA Level 2 (below standard) to Level 3 or 4 (meeting or exceeding the standard) than a comparison group of students.”

TITLE:

The Impact of Reading Plus on Reading Proficiency Growth as Measured by the Smarter Balanced (SBAC) and InSight Assessments: 2015-2016 School Year

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS:

Students who completed at least 80 Reading Plus lessons were more likely to advance from not meeting to meeting the SBAC standard than students who did not engage in Reading Plus. This brief also discusses the strong alignment between the SBAC and InSight assessments.

“Students who engaged in more Reading Plus practice achieved larger gains on both the Smarter Balanced (SBAC) and InSight assessments.”

TITLE:

Reading Motivation and Reading Success: A Two-Way Street

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS:

This report focuses on two key domains of motivation (reading interest and reading confidence) and how they relate to reading comprehension, efficiency, and overall reading proficiency. Across all grade groups (grades 2-5; 6-8; and 9-12), students who reported higher levels of interest and confidence also demonstrated significantly higher levels of reading comprehension and reading efficiency (p < .001). As well, increases in interest and confidence over the school year were larger in students who increased their reading proficiency to a greater extent.

“Reading motivation and reading success go hand-in-hand.”

TITLE:

Reading Efficiency: The Gateway to Comprehension & Motivation

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS:

When reading is slow and arduous, comprehension and motivation suffer. Analyses of national data clearly showed that students who read more efficiently also had higher levels of comprehension and motivation. Across all grade groups (grades 2-5; 6-8; and 9-12), students in higher reading rate quartile groups always achieved significantly higher comprehension levels and reported significantly higher levels of reading interest and self-efficacy (p < .001).

“Reading efficiency gains together with improved reading comprehension contribute to significant reading proficiency growth. Reading efficiency is critically associated with continued enthusiasm for reading and perseverance throughout the high school years.”

TITLE:

The Effect of Reading Plus® on Reading Proficiency Growth: National Results for the 2015-2016 School Year

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS:

Students who completed at least 100 Reading Plus lessons significantly increased their capacity to comprehend progressively more complex texts, developed their capacity to understand higher level vocabulary, and improved their reading efficiency. (p < .001). The results also showed that students developed more confidence and increased their interest in reading.

“Reading Plus practice improves students’ reading proficiency and motivation, which in turn increases the likelihood that they will use reading as a means to expand their knowledge, to be entertained, and to seek inspiration.”

TITLE:

Reading Plus® Significantly Raises the Reading Achievement of Adult Students

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS:

Results were unequivocal. Reading proficiency gains achieved by adults who engaged in more Reading Plus practice were significantly larger than those achieved by adults who practiced less often (p < .001).

“These results suggest that the Reading Plus program is an effective tool for increasing reading proficiency in adult students.”

TITLE:

Reading Plus® Significantly Raises the Reading Achievement of Both Lower- and Higher-Performing Students

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS:

Across all grades, Reading Plus practice was associated with highly significant (p<.001) increases in reading proficiency as measured by the reading portion of the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test 2.0 (FCAT). This was true for students who previously had below satisfactory performance on the FCAT, as well as those who previously had satisfactory or above satisfactory performance.

“These results suggest that the Reading Plus program is an effective tool for increasing reading proficiency in both lower- and higher-performing students.”

TITLE:

Reading Plus® Significantly Raises Achievement for Students with Learning Disabilities

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS:

Across all grades, Reading Plus practice by students with Learning Disabilities (LD) was associated with highly significant (p<.001) increases in reading proficiency as measured by the reading portion of the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test 2.0 (FCAT). Reading Plus use also resulted in more than three times as many students with LD advancing from below satisfactory to a satisfactory level or higher on the FCAT.

“These results suggest that the Reading Plus program is an effective tool for increasing reading proficiency in Students with Learning Disabilities.”

TITLE:

Reading Plus® Significantly Raises Achievement for Students Eligible for Subsidized Lunch.

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS:

Students from families with incomes ranging up to 185 percent of the poverty threshold are eligible for free or reduced price lunch. For this reason, eligibility for subsidized lunch is often used as a proxy measure for family income. Across all grades, Reading Plus practice by students who are eligible for free or reduced price lunch was associated with highly significant (p<.001) increases in reading proficiency as measured by the reading portion of the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test 2.0 (FCAT). In addition, Reading Plus students receiving subsidized lunches were significantly more likely than their higher income peers who did not use Reading Plus to advance from below satisfactory to a satisfactory level or higher on the FCAT.

“These results suggest that the Reading Plus program is an effective tool for developing reading proficiency in students from lower-income families.”

TITLE:

Reading Plus Significantly Raises Achievement for English Language Learners (ELLs).

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS:

Reading Plus usage by ELL students was associated with highly significant (p<.001) increases in reading proficiency as measured by the reading portion of the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test 2.0 (FCAT). Reading Plus use resulted in larger FCAT scale score gains, higher percentages of students advancing one or more levels on the FCAT, and more students achieving a satisfactory level or higher. Gains among ELL students with lower levels of English proficiency were exceptionally large.

“These results suggest that the Reading Plus program is an effective tool for developing reading proficiency in ELL students.” 

Title:

More Reading Plus® lessons completed = Significantly greater reading proficiency gains
Follow-up study with a matched student sample

Summary of Findings:

Reading Plus usage was associated with highly significant (p<.001) increases in reading proficiency scores as measured by Pearson’s nationally normed Group Reading Assessment Diagnostic Evaluation (GRADE™). Further, significantly larger increases in reading proficiency were associated with increased program use (p=.03) across four groups of students who were closely matched on the basis of their pre-training GRADE scores. Students who completed at least 100 SeeReader lessons (~30 hours) achieved reading proficiency score increases four times as large as those measured in students who completed 40 or fewer lessons (~7 hours).

“The results of this follow-up analysis show that students who were closely matched on the basis of their pre-training reading scores (as measured by the GRADE™) achieved significantly larger reading proficiency increases with greater amounts of Reading Plus practice.”

Title:

Impact of Reading Plus on Shelby County Schools middle school students’ reading proficiency scores as measured by a norm-referenced diagnostic reading assessment: Initial findings

Summary of Findings:

Students who completed at least 100 Reading Plus lessons (~30 hours) achieved reading proficiency score increases nearly four times as large as those measured in students who completed 20 or fewer lessons (~5 hours). Further, the GRADE standard score gains achieved by the students who completed 100 or more Reading Plus lessons were nearly four times as large as gains measured in studies published by the U.S. Department of Education describing the results of other supplemental literacy programs that involved more than three hours per week over two semesters (Somers, Corrin, Sepanik, et al., 2010).

“The results of this study show a significant impact of Reading Plus practice on the reading proficiency scores as measured using Pearson’s nationally normed Group Reading Assessment Diagnostic Evaluation (GRADE™).”

Title:

Building capacity in low-performing readers: Results of two months of Reading Plus practice

Summary of Findings:

The results of the first two months of Reading Plus practice are exceptionally encouraging. The data indicate that even the most severely struggling students are benefitting from Reading Plus practice. For severely challenged readers facing Common Core demands, this first report indicates that it may be possible to narrow substantially the gap between where students are and where they are expected to be with consistent and well-designed opportunities to read.

“Even with rigorous criteria, each group increased capacity to efficiently read more complex text.“

Title:

Exploring the value-added of a guided, silent reading intervention: Effects on struggling third-grade students’ reading achievement

Summary of Findings:

Reading Plus demonstrated a statistically significant effect on retained third-grade students’ FCAT achievement at a probability level of < .001. By improving from FCAT level 1 to FCAT level 3 or higher, 78% of the Reading Plus students achieved a passing FCAT level. In contrast, only 32% of the control group students achieved a passing FCAT level, and 45% of the control group students were not able to improve and remained at FCAT level 1. All Reading Plus students advanced at least 1 FCAT level.

Note: This Brief is a summary of the full article that was published in The Journal of Educational Research, Volume 105, Issue 6, September 2012, pp. 404-15

“Seventy-eight percent of the Reading Plus students improved by at least 2 FCAT levels, achieving a passing FCAT level.”

Title:

What is the effectiveness of Reading Plus on ninth-grade intermediate ELL students’ reading scores as measured by the GRADE™?

Summary of Findings:

Reading Plus demonstrated a statistically significant effect on ninth-grade intermediate ELL students’ reading scores. The Reading Plus treatment group made significantly higher reading gains than the control group in both vocabulary and reading comprehension as measured by the GRADE™ test.

“The Reading Plus group also achieved significantly higher gains within both Vocabulary and Comprehension Composite subcomponents.“

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