Reading Plus

National Research

TITLE:

Reading Motivation and Reading Success: A Two-Way Street

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS:

This report focuses on two key domains of motivation (reading interest and reading confidence) and how they relate to reading comprehension, efficiency, and overall reading proficiency. Across all grade groups (grades 2-5; 6-8; and 9-12), students who reported higher levels of interest and confidence also demonstrated significantly higher levels of reading comprehension and reading efficiency (p < .001). As well, increases in interest and confidence over the school year were larger in students who increased their reading proficiency to a greater extent.

“Reading motivation and reading success go hand-in-hand.”

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TITLE:

Reading Efficiency: The Gateway to Comprehension & Motivation

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS:

When reading is slow and arduous, comprehension and motivation suffer. Analyses of national data clearly showed that students who read more efficiently also had higher levels of comprehension and motivation. Across all grade groups (grades 2-5; 6-8; and 9-12), students in higher reading rate quartile groups always achieved significantly higher comprehension levels and reported significantly higher levels of reading interest and self-efficacy (p < .001).

“Reading efficiency gains together with improved reading comprehension contribute to significant reading proficiency growth. Reading efficiency is critically associated with continued enthusiasm for reading and perseverance throughout the high school years.”

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TITLE:

The Effect of Reading Plus on Reading Proficiency Growth: National Results for the 2015-2016 School Year

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS:

Students who completed at least 100 Reading Plus lessons significantly increased their capacity to comprehend progressively more complex texts, developed their capacity to understand higher level vocabulary, and improved their reading efficiency. (p < .001). The results also showed that students developed more confidence and increased their interest in reading.

“Reading Plus practice improves students’ reading proficiency and motivation, which in turn increases the likelihood that they will use reading as a means to expand their knowledge, to be entertained, and to seek inspiration.”

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Title:

Building capacity in low-performing readers: Results of two months of Reading Plus practice

Summary of Findings:

The results of the first two months of Reading Plus practice are exceptionally encouraging. The data indicate that even the most severely struggling students are benefitting from Reading Plus practice. For severely challenged readers facing Common Core demands, this first report indicates that it may be possible to narrow substantially the gap between where students are and where they are expected to be with consistent and well-designed opportunities to read.

“Even with rigorous criteria, each group increased capacity to efficiently read more complex text.“

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Title:

The Decline of Comprehension-Based Silent Reading Efficiency in the U.S.: A Comparison of Current Data with Performance in 1960

Summary of Findings:

This national study measured the comprehension-based silent reading efficiency of U.S. students in Grades 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12, and compared the results to those obtained from U.S. students in 1960. The results suggest that, in comparison to 1960, present-day students are less efficient readers and are more reliant on the sub-lexical analysis of text, rather than reading with the automaticity that can only be developed with practice and wide reading.

“The present research adds to an ample body of evidence suggesting that the reading proficiency of students in the U.S. is declining. The majority of our high school graduates lack adequate reading proficiency and have little experience with the sorts of challenging text they will face in postsecondary educational settings.”

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Title:

Teaching Children to Read: An Evidence-Based Assessment of the Scientific Research Literature on Reading and its Implications for Reading Instruction

Publication:

Report of the National Reading Panel, Report of the Sub-Groups (MIH Publication No. 00-4754). Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office. 2000

Summary

The report reviewed and assessed scientific research on reading instruction conducted by the National Reading Panel and various other researchers. In the chapter on fluency, it describes how eye-movement research in the past “has provided a perspective from which to observe the fluent reading process.” Through studies of eye-movement measures by Stanford E. Taylor, founder of Taylor Associates, and other researchers, it was found that fluent readers make fewer fixations, shorter duration of fixations, and fewer regressions than those of poor readers. Taylor’s norms for oculomotor behavior with over 12,000 students were cited.

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