Reading Plus

19th European Conference on Eye Movement, ECEM 2017

Bergische Universität Wuppertal, Germany

The Reliability of Reading Efficiency Measures Obtained by Classroom Educators Using a Low-Cost Eye Movement Recording System

Alexandra N. Spichtig, Ph.D., Jeffrey P. Pascoe, Ph.D., and John D. Ferrara, M.Ed.

The Visagraph is a low-cost portable eye movement recording system used by schools, clinics, and vision specialists to track eye-movement behavior during reading and to assess silent reading efficiency. This research examined the test-retest reliability of the Visagraph when used by classroom educators to measure silent reading efficiency in students ranging from second to twelfth grade (approximately 7 to 18 years old). Across all measures, reliability was lowest in grades 2-4. In grades 6 and above, reliability coefficients averaged .86 for reading rate and .80 for fixations, with coefficients of variation (CVs) between 9% and 11%. Measures of fixation duration had lower CVs, while regressions had the highest.

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Effects of Scaffolded Silent Reading Practice on the Reading Related Eye Movements of US Students in Grades 4 and 5

Kristin M. Gehsmann, Ed.D., Alexandra N. Spichtig, Ph.D., Jeffrey P. Pascoe, Ph.D., and John D. Ferrara, M.Ed.

This research evaluated the impact of scaffolded silent reading practice (SSRP) on four measures of reading efficiency. Eye movement recordings were collected from fourth and fifth grade students (~ ages 10 and 11) while they read standardized fourth grade level passages, each followed by a brief comprehension test. It was found that the SSRP practice group achieved significantly larger improvements in three reading efficiency measures (reading rate, fixations, and regressions) in comparison to their peers in a matched control group.

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The Correlation between Eye Movement Data and Three Commonly Used Academic Reading Assessments

Alexandra N. Spichtig, Ph.D., Gehsmann, K.M., Ed.D., Jeffrey P. Pascoe, Ph.D., and John D. Ferrara, M.Ed.

An association between reading efficiency and comprehension is often ascribed to individual differences in the distribution of cognitive resources between lexical-processing and comprehension. In this view, the ability to decode words and engage in the process of reading with automaticity (i.e., with little conscious effort or attention) serves to free up finite cognitive resources that can instead be devoted to information processing and the construction of meaning. It follows that reading efficiency should be an important factor in academic achievement. This research examined the relationship between eye movement measures of reading efficiency and academic achievement in US elementary school students. Significant correlations were found between these measures.

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Relationship Between Students’ Stages of Orthographic Knowledge and Reading Efficiency

Kristin M. Gehsmann, Ed.D., M. Elias Tousley, Alexandra N. Spichtig, Ph.D., Jeffrey P. Pascoe, Ph.D., and John D. Ferrara, M.Ed.

Developmental spelling assessments are commonly used to inventory the orthographic features (e.g., consonants, vowels, inflected endings, syllable juncture, affixes, and Greek and Latin elements) students use when spelling a list of 25–35 intentionally selected words. Research has identified five distinct stages of spelling development as well as reciprocal relationships between spelling and reading development. This research evaluated the relationship between eye movement measures of reading efficiency and students’ orthographic knowledge. A strong relationship was found between these measures.

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