Reading Plus

District Level Research

TITLE:

The Effect of Reading Plus on Student Achievement as Measured by the Smarter Balanced (SBAC) Assessment

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS:

Students who completed at least 80% of recommended Reading Plus assignments (100 lessons / 30 hours) achieved significantly larger gains on the SBAC ELA assessment in comparison to a group of demographically similar students who had minimal or no Reading Plus use (p < .001).

“Three times as many Reading Plus students advanced from SBAC ELA Level 2 (below standard) to Level 3 or 4 (meeting or exceeding the standard) than a comparison group of students.”

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TITLE:

The Impact of Reading Plus on Reading Proficiency Growth as Measured by the Smarter Balanced (SBAC) and InSight Assessments: 2015-2016 School Year

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS:

Students who completed at least 80 Reading Plus lessons were more likely to advance from not meeting to meeting the SBAC standard than students who did not engage in Reading Plus. This brief also discusses the strong alignment between the SBAC and InSight assessments.

“Students who engaged in more Reading Plus practice achieved larger gains on both the Smarter Balanced (SBAC) and InSight assessments.”

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Title:

More Reading Plus® lessons completed = Significantly greater reading proficiency gains
Follow-up study with a matched student sample

Summary of Findings:

Reading Plus usage was associated with highly significant (p<.001) increases in reading proficiency scores as measured by Pearson’s nationally normed Group Reading Assessment Diagnostic Evaluation (GRADE™). Further, significantly larger increases in reading proficiency were associated with increased program use (p=.03) across four groups of students who were closely matched on the basis of their pre-training GRADE scores. Students who completed at least 100 SeeReader lessons (~30 hours) achieved reading proficiency score increases four times as large as those measured in students who completed 40 or fewer lessons (~7 hours).

“The results of this follow-up analysis show that students who were closely matched on the basis of their pre-training reading scores (as measured by the GRADE™) achieved significantly larger reading proficiency increases with greater amounts of Reading Plus practice.”

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Title:

Impact of Reading Plus on Shelby County Schools middle school students’ reading proficiency scores as measured by a norm-referenced diagnostic reading assessment: Initial findings

Summary of Findings:

Students who completed at least 100 Reading Plus lessons (~30 hours) achieved reading proficiency score increases nearly four times as large as those measured in students who completed 20 or fewer lessons (~5 hours). Further, the GRADE standard score gains achieved by the students who completed 100 or more Reading Plus lessons were nearly four times as large as gains measured in studies published by the U.S. Department of Education describing the results of other supplemental literacy programs that involved more than three hours per week over two semesters (Somers, Corrin, Sepanik, et al., 2010).

“The results of this study show a significant impact of Reading Plus practice on the reading proficiency scores as measured using Pearson’s nationally normed Group Reading Assessment Diagnostic Evaluation (GRADE™).”

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Title:

Exploring the value-added of a guided, silent reading intervention: Effects on struggling third-grade students’ reading achievement

Summary of Findings:

Reading Plus demonstrated a statistically significant effect on retained third-grade students’ FCAT achievement at a probability level of < .001. By improving from FCAT level 1 to FCAT level 3 or higher, 78% of the Reading Plus students achieved a passing FCAT level. In contrast, only 32% of the control group students achieved a passing FCAT level, and 45% of the control group students were not able to improve and remained at FCAT level 1. All Reading Plus students advanced at least 1 FCAT level.

Note: This Brief is a summary of the full article that was published in The Journal of Educational Research, Volume 105, Issue 6, September 2012, pp. 404-15

“Seventy-eight percent of the Reading Plus students improved by at least 2 FCAT levels, achieving a passing FCAT level.”

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Title:

What is the effectiveness of Reading Plus on ninth-grade intermediate ELL students’ reading scores as measured by the GRADE™?

Summary of Findings:

Reading Plus demonstrated a statistically significant effect on ninth-grade intermediate ELL students’ reading scores. The Reading Plus treatment group made significantly higher reading gains than the control group in both vocabulary and reading comprehension as measured by the GRADE™ test.

“The Reading Plus group also achieved significantly higher gains within both Vocabulary and Comprehension Composite subcomponents.“

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RP_RESULTS_ElementStudyImage

THE RESEARCH

Dade County Public Schools conducted an independent analysis of interventions used within their district. The analysis examined students in grades 3 through 10 who were at different levels of ability. The analysis was conducted to determine the effectiveness of programs in improving students’ reading and/or math FCAT scores.

THE RESULTS

The results showed that Reading Plus had a significant positive effect for students of all ability levels and at all grade levels. This report was also conducted for the 2010/2011 school year with nearly identical results leading Miami Dade Public Schools to state that Reading Plus was found to have a consistent beneficial impact on the achievement of the students who used the program.

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Full Technical Documentation

Title:

Exploring a guided, silent reading intervention: Effects on struggling third-grade readers’ achievement

Authors:

D. Ray Reutzel, Yaacov Petscher, and Alexandra N. Spichtig

Publication:

The Journal of Educational Research Volume 105, Issue 6, September 2012, pp. 404-15

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of a supplementary, guided, silent reading intervention with 80 struggling third-grade readers who were retained at grade level as a result of poor performance on the reading portion of a criterion referenced state assessment. The students were distributed in 11 elementary schools in a large, urban school district in the state of Florida. A matched, quasi-experimental design was constructed using propensity scores for this study.

Students in the guided, silent reading intervention, Reading Plus, evidenced higher, statistically significant mean scores on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) criterion assessment measure of reading at posttest. The effect size, favoring the guided, silent reading intervention group was large, one full standard deviation, when comparing the two comparison groups’ mean posttest scores. As such, this study indicates a large advantage for providing struggling third-grade readers guided silent reading fluency practice in a computer-based practice environment.

Title:

The Effect of the Reading Plus Program on Reading Skills in Second Graders

Authors

John Shelley-Tremblay and Joshua Eyer

Publication:

Journal of Behavioral Optometry, Vol. 20, No. 3, 2009

Summary

The study assessed gains in reading skills and oculomotor efficiency in second graders in a public school in Woodland, TX.

Findings

Results demonstrated that Reading Plus produced significantly larger gains than randomly assigned controls in comprehension and word knowledge in normally achieving second graders. These results suggest that, in addition to the findings of Solan and collaborators using poor readers, normal and above-average readers in a normal classroom setting can benefit significantly from the addition of Reading Plus to their school curriculum. Analysis of the Visagraph data demonstrated that measures of ocular efficiency were significant predictors of changes in reading skills.

Independent Studies: Miami Dade, Florida

RP_RESULTS_SecondaryStudyImage

THE RESEARCH

Dade County Public Schools conducted an independent analysis of interventions   used within their district. The analysis examined students in grades 3 through 10 at all levels of ability. The analysis was conducted to determine the effectiveness of programs in improving students’ reading and/or math FCAT scores.

THE RESULTS

The results showed that Reading Plus had a significant positive effect for students of all ability levels and at all grade levels. This report was also conducted for the 2010/2011 school year with nearly identical results leading M-DCPS to state that Reading Plus was found to have a consistent beneficial impact on the achievement of the students who used the program.

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Full Technical Documentation

Title:

The Relationship Between a Silent Reading Fluency Instructional Protocol on Students’ Reading Comprehension and Achievement in an Urban School Setting

Authors:

Timothy Rasinski, S. Jay Samuels, Elfrieda Hiebert, and Yaacov Petscher

Publication:

Reading Psychology, Vol. 32, No. 1, January 2011, pp. 75-97

Summary:

The study examined a large-scale implementation of Reading Plus to validate the effects as well as the feasibility of deployment of Reading Plus within a wide range of school settings. A total of 16,143 students from grades 4 through 10 in 23 schools in Regions II and III in the Miami-Dade County Public Schools participated in the study.

Findings:

Results indicated that students participating in Reading Plus for a minimum of 40 or more lessons over approximately six months made significantly greater gains on both the criterion-referenced and norm-referenced reading tests that are part of the Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test (FCAT) than students who did not participate in the program. Positive results also were demonstrated for various subpopulations often considered at risk for reading difficulties. African-American, Latino-American, special education, and learning disabled students who participated in the Reading Plus intervention demonstrated significantly and substantially greater gains in measures of reading achievement on both the CRT and NRT portions of the FCAT than students not participating in the intervention.

Title:

The Effect of the Reading Plus Program on Reading Skills in Secondary Students

Author:

North East Florida Educational Consortium’s Foundation for Rural Excellence (NEFEC) and Educational Learning Systems, Inc.

Unpublished study conducted by North East Florida Educational Consortium’s Foundation for Rural Excellence (NEFEC) and Educational Learning Systems, Inc.

Findings:

While the control group showed no significant gains on the Gates-MacGinitie Reading Test, the treatment group made statistically significant gains (from pre-test scores of 33.7 to post-test scores of 42.3). The treatment group also made higher gains on the Visagraph GLE (3.6 to 6.8) than the control group (4.0 to 4.6), as well as the Visagraph Reading Rate with Comprehension (142.5 to 182.9 for the treatment group and 140.4 to 149.5 for the control group). On the FCAT, the treatment group showed the most gains with a score change of 220.18, while the control group showed lesser gains with a score change of 142.4.

Title:

Evaluation of the Reading Plus 2000 and Visagraph System as a Remedial Program for Academically ‘At Risk’ Sixth and Eighth Grade Students: A Pilot Study

Authors:

Darrel G. Schlange, H. Patel, and Brian Caden

Publication:

Optometry and Vision Science, Vol. 76, poster 11, 1999

Summary:

The study was conducted at Shields Elementary School in Chicago. At-risk students were assigned to receive instruction with an earlier version of Reading Plus. Students received three sessions per week for a total of 40 sessions, in addition to their regular classroom instruction.

Findings:

Results showed that students in the sixth and eighth grades who received training with Reading Plus made significant improvements (p<.001) with a gain of 0.9 and 2.3 levels in their GLE as measured by the Visagraph, respectively. In addition, the sixth and eighth graders had a significant average ITBS gain of 1 year 5 months (p<.001) as compared to the school’s average student gain of 1 year 1 month. Beyond the reading gains, students also improved in visual skills, reducing instances in which the two eyes performed differently in terms of binocular coordination (p<.0005).

 

Title:

National Research Project: Northeastern Junior College Comparison Study 2006-2007

Author:

Victoria Tarbell

Publication:

White Paper (Unpublished)

Summary:

The study involved college students enrolled in remedial reading courses.

Findings:

Findings: Students who continued for a second semester showed much greater gains on average than did those who participated in Reading Plus for one semester. A one semester gain was also seen in the 25 students who were both pre- and post-tested using the Visagraph Eye-Movement Recording System. The students improved their reading efficiency by an average of 4.6 Grade Level Equivalents in a single semester. The expected improvement over a year without specific training is 1.0 GLE. Within the Reading Plus program, the students improved their Part B, or guided slot, rate by an average of 92% while maintaining an average comprehension of 70% over an average of 43 lessons.

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Title:

Effectiveness of an On-Line Computerized Eye-Movement Training Program to Improve Oculomotor Control in Adult Readers: A Pilot Study

Authors:

Kim Tran, Cui Yu, Tomohito Okumura, and Hannu R.V. Laukkanen

Publication:

Journal of Behavioral Optometry, Vol. 15, No. 5, 2004, pp.115-121

Summary:

The study was conducted on eight adults between the ages of 24 and 35. Five subjects in the treatment group completed ten weeks of Reading Plus and the other three were placed in a control group with no intervention. Both groups were pre- and post-tested with the Visagraph for fixations, regressions, span of recognition, duration of fixations, reading rate with comprehension, and reading comprehension.

Findings:

After post-testing on the Visagraph, results indicated greater improvement on all of the measurable categories listed above for the treatment group, while the control group showed very little change.

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